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New research shows more than half of GPs feel people with neurological conditions “do not receive a timely diagnosis”

The Neurological Alliance, of which the Dystonia Society is a member, has conducted a survey of more than 1,000 GPs across the UK to test their views on diagnosing and referring people with neurological conditions.

The survey found that:

  • 85% of GPs in England are either ‘somewhat concerned’ or ‘extremely concerned’ about the time taken from referral for patients to see a consultant neurologist.
  • 59% of GPs believe that the local services and systems in place in their area mean that people with neurological conditions frequently do not receive a timely diagnosis.
  • The large majority of GPs in England feel that they could benefit from further training on identifying and managing people presenting with neurological conditions.
  • Fewer than half of GPs (47%) felt confident in their ability to make an initial assessment and referral for people presenting with signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS).
  • The survey did not specifically ask about diagnosis of dystonia, but instead asked about some of the best known and most common neurological conditions like MS. The findings, that many GPs were not even confident of diagnosing MS, suggest that very few would be confident in diagnosing a rarer condition like dystonia.

The survey also highlights the delays in getting to see neurologists, and the concerns about the availability of local services, all of which reflect the evidence we receive about dystonia.

The Neurological Alliance has pulled their survey into a report, a full copy of which can be found on their website.

 

Neurological Alliance GP Survey

New research shows more than half of GPs feel people with neurological conditions “do not receive a timely diagnosis”

The Neurological Alliance, of which the Dystonia Society is a member, has conducted a survey of more than 1,000 GPs across the UK to test their views on diagnosing and referring people with neurological conditions.

The survey found that:

  • 85% of GPs in England are either ‘somewhat concerned’ or ‘extremely concerned’ about the time taken from referral for patients to see a consultant neurologist.
  • 59% of GPs believe that the local services and systems in place in their area mean that people with neurological conditions frequently do not receive a timely diagnosis.
  • The large majority of GPs in England feel that they could benefit from further training on identifying and managing people presenting with neurological conditions.
  • Fewer than half of GPs (47%) felt confident in their ability to make an initial assessment and referral for people presenting with signs and symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

The survey did not specifically ask about diagnosis of dystonia, but instead asked about some of the best known and most common neurological conditions like MS. The findings, that many GPs were not even confident of diagnosing MS, suggest that very few would be confident in diagnosing a rarer condition like dystonia.

The survey also highlights the delays in getting to see neurologists, and the concerns about the availability of local services, all of which reflect the evidence we receive about dystonia.

The Neurological Alliance has pulled their survey into a report, a full copy of which can be found on their website at www.neural.org.uk.

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